Jun 252013
 

Join us this Saturday, June 29 1-4pm, for this month’s installment of our Make-Along series!

Make-AlongA Monthly Crafting Event at NYCR
This is not your typical craft class.  Make-Along is a self-guided craft workshop where participants learn new skills, explore new materials, and make great things! 

This Month’s Topic:  Stuffed Toys!
In this session we’ll be exploring the wonderful world of plushies, amigurumi, and other stuffed toys, including ones specifically made for the tiniest of makers. A perfect session to make a gift for all your baby-expecting friends or to make yourself a squishy new BFF to clutch while you nervously watch GAME OF THRONES. (For the record Grumpy Cat is NOT impressed with that show.)

makealongstuffed1

Are you a beginner?  We’ll provide materials for a variety of projects and will help you learn to use a sewing machine, hand-stitch, crochet, and will help guide you through anything else your project requires.

Are you a master?  Show off your skills and inspire others!  Bring a project, use our materials, and hang out in a great space while doing what you love!

Looking for project ideas?  Check out our Pinterest board.

SIGN UP NOW!

makealongstuffed2

(Patterns and high-fives for the images on this page: Ring Baby Toy, Grumpy Cat, Peas in a Pod, Star Baby Toy)

 

Future Crew

 Uncategorized  2 Responses »
Jun 212013
 

Last month we introduced Future Crew, and at the 2013 Interactive Show we finally unveiled the fully mostly operational game stations. There were five stations in the final design, and in keeping with the show’s “Digital Archaeology” theme, each was built from repurposed ancient hardware. The brains of each console was a Raspberry Pi (to connect to the network and draw OpenGL graphics) and some number of Teensy microcontrollers to interface with the real world. Of course, the source is available for you to build your own Future Crew stations!

Future Crew Game

A discarded video edit console and RF TV became the Timeline controller. Since the Pi can turn the composite video on-and-off, one of the modes glitches out the TV occasionally with real static! This one had some of the more imaginative tasks like “disable all blinking buttons” in addition to the normal tasks like “advance the timeline!”.

Future Crew Game

A rackmount data acquisition analog-digital converter and three NTSC TVs became the Blender control unit and Technobabble patch panel. The labels were printed on our large format plotter and then the BNC holes were cut on the laser cutter. The teensy++ firmware can handle arbitrary cross connects and even multi-way connections. This was one of the harder stations to play — there are eight switches, twenty verbs and twenty nouns. We ended up disabling all the verbs except “MODULATE” since it was much too difficult to find the right ones. As a todo item we plan to ramp up the difficulty as the game goes on.

Future Crew Game

A 1930′s Model 15 Teletype and some random video switcher served as the slowest output console. It’s amazing that the teletype functioned nearly perfectly for the entire eight hour show — perhaps the fresh quart of oil during the previous servicing helped keep it working. The source for this console is one of the simpler ones — it just prints to a file descriptor to write to the teletype.

Future Crew Game

One of the hardest consoles was made from a toy piano. Even with the song book, playing “Row Row Row Your Boat” under duress is not easy.

Dial James Bond!

And a last minute entry was a rotary phone. Quick! Get the President on the line! This time the handset just had a recorded loop, but future games will incorporate text to speech.

We have a whole list of things to fix and improvements to make before Makerfaire 2013. Stop by NYCR to play it during Craft Night on Thursdays and give us your suggestions!

 Posted by at 11:54 am
Jun 092013
 

te_zero_detect

Take that Babbage! A *working* mechanical computer. That’s right, I said it. Come check out the Turbo Entabulator at the upcoming NYCResistor Interactive Show this coming Saturday! This is the latest diabolical machine to come out of the labs at Fenton Heavy Industries. Its lack of speed is only surpassed by its unreliability and general mechanical shakiness. But hey, it’s probably the only computer you can print out yourself.

Space Rocks

 Uncategorized  2 Responses »
Jun 082013
 

Space Rocks on the oscillograph

Cathode ray oscillographs weren’t just used for reading tweets in the 1940′s, they were also used as vector displays for serious astronomical simulations and training systems like “Space Rocks”. You can play it at the 2013 NYC Resistor Interactive Show!

While the Delta-V of the simulator space craft was optimistic for its era, the basic acceleration, velocity and position model is reasonably accurate. If the ship passes too closely to one of the space rocks, it is destroyed and the simulation restarts. Once the ship runs out of fuel (measured in hexadecimal in the upper left corner since the CPU can’t perform a DIV/MOD operation fast enough to display decimal numbers), it is stranded and unable to continue its mission.

Space Rocks joystick interface

We were not able to locate an original controller, but the interface is similar enough to more modern analog joysticks that we could wire it in. Have your own vector display? spacerocks.c is the source for the Teensy to drive it.

 Posted by at 10:07 pm
Jun 082013
 

photo2 There’s nothing like a big party to force some cleaning… would you look at our toilet? I mean… I’m not even sure it was this clean when we moved in.  Someone will think some magic cleaning elves descended upon it in the dead of night.

This is just so you’ve been alerted… that the facilities will be clean for our 4th Annual Interactive Party this coming Saturday June 15.  We’ll have great projects, wine, a DJ and dancing under a great big LED illuminated arch.

Go get tickets now, as they are moving and we’re not sure we’ll have any left to sell at the door… http://interactiveshow2013-eorg.eventbrite.com/#

Jun 062013
 

Model 15 rear view

The Teletype Corporation Model 15 “typebar page printer” is a beautiful piece of equipment from the 1930′s. While the interface has much in common with modern serial communication standards – start bits and stop bits, asynchronous clocking, idle-high conditions — in the teletype all of these are implemented purely mechanically. The mainshaft looks like something out of an automobile instead of a piece of computing. Just like a car, you have to keep it well oiled, check the gaps for proper clearances and be very wary of the spinning pieces while working on it.

The 5-bit Baudot words are clocked in synchronously with the mainshaft’s rotation rate at 45.5 baud (22 ms per bit). This slow speed is difficult to generate with modern computers and serial ports, so many users bit-bang the port with Heavy Metal, which itself requires somewhat older machines to run. The 5-bit word has only thirty two entries, which is insufficient to simultaneously represent the entirety of the twenty six letters A-Z, ten digits 0-9 and punctuation. Instead there is a reserved code to switch to Figures and another code to switch to Letters. Space, carriage return and line feed are present in both the Letter and Figure sets. The interface must track which rail is currently selected and insert the correct shift sequences on the fly.

In slow motion the holding magnet can be seen pulling the selector during one-bits and not attracting it during the zero-bits. Each bit is latched via the “sword” mechanisms onto one of the rails, which select one of the twenty-eight hammers. During the fifth bit an extra gear cocks the mechanism and a latch lets the hammer fly during the stop bit. The coils are designed for 60 mA, but have a very high inductance (on the order of 4 Henries according to John Nagel). Most approaches to interfacing with the system use a large 100 VDC power supply and a current limiting resistor (that must dissipate 6 W of power!).



Teletype Model 15 USB interface board

Both the high voltage and the custom baud rate issues are a bit cumbersome, so I thought there must be a better way. USB ports will output about 5 W, so I figured that would be close enough to drive the magnet if I could produce sufficiently high voltage. Using Adafruit’s boost converter calculator, I came up with some rough numbers and built a circuit that handles both the slow baud rate and voltage required to interface with the teletype. It shows up as a normal USB serial port and handles the 7-bit ASCII to 5-bit Baudot translation, including tracking which of the two rails is selected, outputs the bits at the correct baud rate, and runs the PWM charge pump to generate the high voltage with the inductor. A second MOSFET is used to switch the high voltage through the current loop, allowing the holding magnet to turn on and off.

It’s fully self-contained, fits in an Altoids tin and works with any software you want to run on the interface computer. If you want to run it with a Raspberry Pi, be sure to use a powered hub to avoid overloading the Pi’s weak USB power circuitry. The schematics and source code are posted to 45baud.net and you can see it in action as part of Future Crew at the digital archeology themed 2013 NYC Resistor Interactive Party.

 Posted by at 7:53 pm
May 272013
 

Oscillograph tweet reader

It’s a little known fact that during the 1940′s the premier Twitter client was a cathode ray oscillograph vector display, such as this DuMont Labs 208B. The 15×12 character resolution was perfect for a 140 character tweet. This one has been restored, connected to the aethernet and configured to search for “I”, turning it into a time travelling view into the twitter-sphere’s narcissism. You can see it in action in this short video, or play with it in person at the 2013 NYC Resistor Interactive Party in June.

Asteroids vector font

If the font looks familiar, that’s because it was inspired by the Asteroids video game, with additional characters for the rest of the ASCII subset. The source code is available asteroids-font.c for your own oscilloscope or vector display hacking. Depending on the bandwidth of your scope and the speed of the cathode ray tube, you might need to set CONFIG_SLOW_SCOPE to give the beam time to catch up with the image.

 Posted by at 10:25 pm
May 242013
 

Some technologies are so direct and intuitive that they feel classic even when they’re new. Some technologies are so ahead of their time that they only find their true purpose years after they’ve been put out to pasture.
Minitel 1B US
In the early 80′s, France Telecom rolled out the Minitel, a videotex system offering various online services to users across France. Subscribers were given small, semi-portable CRT-based terminals. The service was a success, and at its peak boasted 25 million users. But eventually, well, you know. The internet. In June 2012, France Telecom finally pulled the plug on the Minitel. Screens across the country went dark. Millions of little, boxy terminals, suddenly cast adrift. Widespread technology, lost and alone, in search of purpose. Purpose now, suddenly, found.
welcome_to_tumblr_com
The Minitel/Tumblr Time Tunnel is a Minitel 1B US (yes, there was a QWERTY version) backed by a Raspberry Pi. Enter a few tags at the prompt, and the mighty firehose of Tumblr will be unleashed upon your tiny, 3-bit*, 80×72 pixel black and white CRT display. By cranking the serial port up to 4800 blazin’ bits per second and reducing the number of color swaps, you can view the genius of the internet at such blinding speeds that you’ll think that you’ve suddenly been transported to a Jetsonian future of videophones and cars that collapse into briefcases. It’s just that advanced. See for yourself:

(The asterisk after “3-bit” is due to the fact that each 2×3 block of “pixels” is actually a single character with foreground and background color attributes, so each 2×3 block only has one bit of color data, selected from a palette of 8 colors.)

As is de rigueur, all the code is available on github.

The Minitel/Tumblr Time Tunnels will be on display at this year’s NYCR Interactive Party. Be sure to come by and see the internet the way it positively demands to be seen!

 Posted by at 9:08 pm
May 232013
 

Building "Future Crew" console #1

Do you enjoy playing Space Team, but find that you want tactile controls? Or like the Artemis Bridge Simulator, but think it is too serious? Do you love pushing buttons, turning knobs and shouting at each other? Then you’ll really have fun playing Future Crew at the NYCR Interactive Party!

Future Crew push button panel construction

Since the theme of the party is “Digital Archeology”, all of the control stations are being built from repurposed dead hardware. There’s a patch panel, push buttons, strobe lights, more push buttons, quadrature knobs, oscilloscopes, and maybe even a teletype to keep score.

Future Crew display console

Each console will have a Raspberry Pi with Wifi to talk to the other consoles, some number of Teensys to talk to the real world, and some sort of glitchy way to communicate to the operator (like an NTSC TV or a Minitel). If things don’t work right, that’s part of the fun. And, of course the source code will be available for you to build your own Future Crew Consoles.

Tickets for the party are on sale now!

 Posted by at 8:12 pm