Bre Pettis

Feb 122009
 

open street maps openstreetmaps

Russ Nelson is going to be in town and he’s organized an OpenStreetMap mapping party!

Hey, want to come out, and make NYC a better place to live whilst having fun at the same time? OpenStreetMap is a community-generated Open Source map of everything you think is interesting. “If you want it mapped right, you’ve got to map it yourself.” Don’t have the skills? Well, that’s what a mapping party is for! We’ll have GPS receivers to loan out, we’ll give you some instruction, and turn you loose on an unsuspecting city. You gather interesting positional data, come back, and we’ll show you how to place that on the map. Give it an hour or so, and it shows up on the map that everyone can see. The parties are Saturday 2/14 and Sunday 2/15, 11AM to 4PM, both at Radiance Tea House south of Central Park South. Details here on the OpenStreetMap wiki

Looks like fun!

Feb 012009
 

fire the lazzzor

These classes fill up, reserve your spot now!

Harness the power of an Eplilog 35 Watt Laser! In this class you’ll learn everything you need to know to make the ideas in your head become a reality with a laser.

Bring a laptop and design ideas. If you think of it, install inkscape on your laptop, it’s opensource and free.

In this two hour class, we’ll walk through all the steps from idea to pressing the “go” button on the laser. We’ll cover safety and basic design skills in Inkscape and you’ll learn how to do a burninate test to find out if something is laserable. After the two hours, you’ll have time to prototype something until 3pm!

After learning the basics, each student will create their own design and lasercut it on the laser! A $10 lab fee is included in the ticket price and covers 12″ x 12″ of acrylic or wood and time on the laser cutter to cut and etch it.

I will be providing bagels and cream cheese. Give me a heads up if you are a vegan and I’ll make sure to have some jam or tofu cream cheese!

Photo Credit: Jared Klett

Dec 012008
 

Adam Mayer is a friend of mine and fellow resistor who may be the most prolific person I know. When he decides to do something, he commits totally. Check out one of his previous obsessions documented in the Things video series: the teletype.

Recently he got into gears and gearing and spun that interest into a rad project to make cards with planetary gears embedded in them.

He’s uploaded the plans for the geared card and the geared planetary card to thingiverse so you can make your own!

Adam may be the best kept secret on twitter. If you’re not following him, you should do so now. He’s at http://twitter.com/phooky.

If you like this video, head on over to my blog at brepettis.com/blog where I’m sharing a video every single day for as long as I can stand it!

Nov 292008
 

Edith Kollath is a Resistor who is at the crossroads of art and microcontroller technology. She made the most beautiful books that breathe.

Besides being beautiful objects, this show is also about the TSA. On a trip home to show the books in Germany, the TSA detained her and took the books from her. The story is bizarre and strange and reflects the very weird times we live in today.

Edith is showing the books until December 14th in the damstuhltrager gallery and if you’re in NYC, go see the show and if you collect contemporary art or are just as stunned as I am by their breathing, buy them. (you’ll have the most wonderful breathing bookshelves.)

Here’s a pdf you can download and an earlier article she wrote over on the NYCR blog to read more about her experience

Nov 272008
 

Devon Jones needed a robot to do his bidding and so he made a computer controlled dremel. He found an instructable by Stuart McFarlan and created it using a mix of aluminum stock, an inexpensive wood called MDF, and skate bearings.

It now works so he’s going to be able to use the subtractive process, which means he can take away all the parts of the material that are not his thing, to create whatever he can imagine.

I’m publishing a video everyday. Catch them all over on my blog.

Nov 192008
 

Marisa Olsen pointed me to this interesting panel. I won’t be in the country, but I hope someone can go and report back as to how it went!

Craft Hackers is a panel discussion among artists who use crafting techniques to explore high-tech culture and the relationship between needlework and computer programming. Panelists include Cat Mazza, who translates moving images into stills knit in yarn; Christy Matson, who uses Jacquard Looms (some of the earliest computers) to knit landscape images from computer games; Ben Fino-Radin, whose witty needlepoint sculptures translate the World Wide Web into yarn and plastic, one pixel at a time; and Cody Trepte, whose embroidery of retired computer punch cards rekindles an old-fashioned love affair with the hand of the artist.

Link

Nov 182008
 

I have added a second laser class!

Flying Spaghetti Monster Holiday Ornament

Sign Up For The Class!

If you didn’t get a chance to sign up for Saturday’s class, on Sunday, November 23nd, you can harness the power of an Eplilog 35 Watt Laser! In this class you’ll learn everything you need to know to make the ideas in your head become a reality with a laser.

In this two hour class, we’ll walk through all the steps from idea to pressing the “go” button on the laser. We’ll cover safety and basic design skills in Inkscape, the open source vector editor and you’ll learn how to do a burninate test to find out if something is laserable.

After learning the basics, each student will create their own design and lasercut it on the laser! A $10 lab fee is included in the ticket price and covers 12″ x 12″ of 1/8″ acrylic and time on the laser cutter to cut and etch it. Bring a laptop if you’ve got one and design ideas for your own holiday decorations.

Even though this class doesn’t start insanely early, I will be providing bagels and cream cheese. Give me a heads up if you are a vegan and I’ll make sure to have some jam or tofu cream cheese!

Nov 172008
 

Thingiverse - Digital Designs for Physical Objects

For the last two weeks Thingiverse has been in stealth mode. Zach Hoeken and I schemed it up and he’s been coding like crazy to bring it to life. Invite your friends to the thingiverse and share the universe of things with folks you know!

Fred over at Creative Commons wrote up a very nice article about Thingiverse!

Thingiverse is an “object sharing” site that enables anyone to upload the schematics, designs, and images for their projects. Users can then download and reuse the work in their projects using their own laser cutters, 3D printers, and analog tools. Think of it as a Flickr for the Maker set.

Besides implementing our licenses, Bre and Zach have also gone the distance and allowed users to license works under the GNU GPL, LGPL, and BSD licenses, as well as allowing them to release works into the public domain. Thingiverse uses our license wrappers for each of these licenses thereby enabling automatic indexing by machines like search engines.

Pushing the envelope even further, Thingiverse also fully implements our RDFa specification (just take a look at the source of any page with a CC license to see RDFa in action) for expressing licensing and authorship information on the semantic web. This means that aside from telling machines that a work is licensed under CC, Thingiverse also tells machines the title of a work, its author, and other interesting semantic information.

If you’re looking for a fantastic example of how to implement the commons on a platform designed for sharing creativity, look no further than Thingiverse.

Thanks Fred! We’ll keep doing our best to make this a great place to share things!